What’s the Craziest Thing You’ve Ever Found at a Xerox Machine?

The Reader Center is one way we in the newsroom are trying to connect with you, by highlighting your perspectives and experiences and offering insight into how we work.

Early memories of Xerox machines often involve scanning your hand or face, or punching random buttons that spit out a pile of warm paper at a parent’s workplace.

But for one boy in 1969, the fun also involved secrets of international importance. Thrilled to run a Xerox for the first time, 13-year-old Robert Ellsberg agreed to help his dad, Daniel, a former Department of Defense official, copy some documents. The pages turned out to be the Pentagon Papers, and the rest is, well, history.

But the Xerox machine, the ubiquitous, bulky copier that also spawned the widely used verb, could soon be a cultural relic. On Wednesday, Xerox announced that the Japanese firm Fujifilm would take control of it.

We want to hear our readers’ most memorable Xerox moments. What have you found at a copy machine that made you laugh or blush, or prompted a visit to human resources? What are the tales that you still regale your co-workers with?

Share your stories in the comments, and we may feature some in an article.

Content originally published on https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/31/reader-center/xerox-memories.html by LARA TAKENAGA