57 Best Dividend Stocks You Can Count On in 2019

By Dan Burrows, Contributing Writer, Kiplinger.com

Long-term income investors know that yield isn’t everything when it comes to dividend stocks. Steadily rising payouts pay off down the road, too.

Not only do rising dividends lift the yield on an investor’s original cost basis, they’re indicative of a firm’s ability to withstand the economy’s – and the market’s – inevitable ups and downs.

“Dividend growers tend to be quality franchises built to weather diverse market environments,” BlackRock portfolio manager Tony DeSpirito and now-retired BlackRock PM Robert Shearer wrote in a 2015 report. “If you think about it, these are generally high-quality businesses with ample free cash flow, and that’s precisely what’s needed to grow the dividend. So you have a very attractive combination of quality franchises, solid balance sheets and positive trends in cash flow and earnings.”

The Dividend Aristocrats are companies in Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index that have raised their payouts every year for at least 25 consecutive years. They are a host of household names that offer size, longevity and familiarity, providing comfort amid market uncertainty.

Here are the current 57 Dividend Aristocrats – including several new faces that were just added in January 2019. These have been among the best dividend stocks for income growth over the past few decades, and they’re a great place to start if you’re looking to add new dividend holdings to your long-term portfolios.

Roper Technologies

Market value: $31.0 billion

Dividend yield: 0.6%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 26

Analysts’ opinion: 6 strong buy, 1 buy, 4 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Roper Technologies (ROP, $299.76) – an industrial company whose businesses include medical and scientific imaging, RF technology and software, and energy systems and controls, among others – was added to the Dividend Aristocrats in 2018. The diversified industrial company was tapped for the honor after it hiked its dividend for a 25th straight year at the end of 2017. Then in November 2018, ROP hiked its dividend for a 26th consecutive year, this time by 12% to $1.85 a share on an annual basis.

With a payout ratio of just 15.2%, Roper should have ample room to keep the dividend hikes coming for many years to come.

Sherwin-Williams

Market value: $39.2 billion

Dividend yield: 0.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 40

Analysts’ opinion: 12 strong buy, 1 buy, 6 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Sherwin-Williams (SHW, $420.87) is one of the largest paints, coatings and home-improvement companies in the world, thanks to its $11 billion acquisition of Valspar in 2017. The company’s global reach has actually hindered performance lately, however. Fourth-quarter results fell short of Wall Street’s expectations, hurt by sluggishness overseas.

But longer-term, analysts expect better-than-average profit growth. Analysts polled by Refinitiv expect earnings to grow at an average annual rate of almost 17% for the next five years.

“While the current macroeconomic outlook is less than clear, we see significant opportunities for profitable growth throughout the business,” management said in a news release.

And it’s not like income investors need to worry about Sherwin-Williams’ steady and rising dividend stream. The company has hiked its distribution every year since 1979. SHW pays out just 29% of its earnings as dividends, vs. 40% for the S&P 500, so the company has ample resources to keep the streak alive.

Cintas

Market value: $20.0 billion

Dividend yield: 1.1%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 35

Analysts’ opinion: 5 strong buy, 1 buy, 3 hold, 0 underperform, 1 sell

Cintas (CTAS, $191.55) is perhaps best-known for providing corporate uniforms, but the company also offers maintenance supplies, tile and carpet cleaning services and even compliance training. As such, it’s seen by some investors as a bet on jobs growth.

There may be something to that. Shares have more than tripled over the past five years vs. a gain of just 51% for the S&P 500. In January, the economy notched its 100th consecutive month of employment gains. Meanwhile, weekly jobless claims stand at levels last seen in 1969.

Regardless of how the labor market is doing, Cintas is a stalwart as a dividend payer. The company has raised its payout every year since going public in 1983. Most recently, in October, Cintas raised its annual dividend by 26.5% to $2.05 a share.

Ecolab

Market value: $46.0 billion

Dividend yield: 1.2%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 27

Analysts’ opinion: 8 strong buy, 0 buy, 9 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Ecolab (ECL, $159.14) provides water treatment and other industrial-scale maintenance services for several industries, including food, healthcare, and oil and gas. Ecolab’s fortunes can wane as industrial needs fluctuate, though; for instance, when energy companies pare spending.

Over the long haul, though, ECL shares are a proven winner. Over the past decade, the stock has delivered an annualized return, including dividends, of 18%, vs. just 12% for the S&P 500. That’s thanks in no small part to 27 straight years of dividend increases. The most recent hike came in December, when ECL raised its quarterly payout by 12% to 46 cents.

S&P Global

Market value: $48.4 billion

Dividend yield: 1.2%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 46

Analysts’ opinion: 6 strong buy, 1 buy, 5 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

S&P Global (SPGI, $192.94) has paid a dividend each year since 1937 and is one of fewer than 25 companies in the S&P 500 that has increased its dividend annually for at least the last 46 years, the company notes. Most recently, on Jan. 30, SPGI hiked its quarterly payout by 14% to 57 cents.

Formerly known as McGraw Hill Financial, S&P Global is the company behind S&P Global Ratings, S&P Global Market Intelligence and S&P Global Platts. Although most investors probably know it for its majority stake in S&P Dow Jones Indices, it’s also a central player in corporate and financial analytics, information and research.

Becton Dickinson

Market value: $65.5 billion

Dividend yield: 1.3%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 47

Analysts’ opinion: 12 strong buy, 0 buy, 6 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Medical devices maker Becton Dickinson (BDX, $243.06) first bulked up with its 2015 acquisition of CareFusion, a complementary player in the same industry. In 2017, it struck a $24 billion deal for fellow Dividend Aristocrat C.R. Bard, another medical products company with a strong position in treatments for infectious diseases.

The company, which makes everything from insulin syringes to cell analysis systems, is increasingly looking for growth to be driven by markets outside the U.S., including China. Analysts expect BDX to generate average annual earnings growth of 12.6% for the next five years, according to Refinitiv.

Annual dividend increases stretch back 47 years and counting – a track record that should offer peace of mind to antsy income investors.

Brown-Forman

Market value: $22.7 billion

Dividend yield: 1.4%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 35

Analysts’ opinion: 1 strong buy, 0 buy, 7 hold, 0 underperform, 1 sell

Brown-Forman (BF.B, $47.56) is one of the largest producers and distributors of alcohol in the world. Jack Daniel’s Tennessee whiskey and Finlandia vodka are just two of its best-known brands, with the former helping drive long-term growth. Whiskey is increasingly popular with American tipplers, surveys show, and Jack Daniel’s leads the pack. Tequila sales – Brown-Forman features the Herradura and El Jimador brands, among others – also are on the rise.

The company has raised its payout annually for 35 years, and has delivered an uninterrupted regular payout for 73 years.

Pentair

Market value: $7.2 billion

Dividend yield: 1.7%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 43

Analysts’ opinion: 4 strong buy, 0 buy, 7 hold, 1 underperform, 1 sell

U.K.-based diversified industrial company Pentair (PNR, $41.51) completed the tax-free spinoff of nVent Electric (NVT) last year. The move allows Pentair to focus on its water assets, operating in businesses such as Flow Technologies, Filtration & Process and Aquatic & Environmental Systems. It bulked up those operations with its January acquisition of Aquion for $160 million in cash.

Pentair has raised its dividend annually for 43 straight years, most recently by 3% to 18 cents a quarter. Analysts on average project earnings per share to increase 9% next year, according to a survey by Refinitiv.

Abbott Laboratories

Market value: $129.1 billion

Dividend yield: 1.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 47

Analysts’ opinion: 13 strong buy, 1 buy, 1 hold, 0 underperform, 1 sell

Following its 2013 spinoff of AbbVie – another Dividend Aristocrat on this list – Abbott Laboratories (ABT, $73.52) focused on branded generic drugs, medical devices, nutrition and diagnostic products. Its product list includes the likes of Similac infant formulas, Glucerna diabetes management products and i-Stat diagnostics devices.

The company has been expanding by acquisition as of late, including medical-device firm St. Jude Medical and rapid-testing technology business Alere, both snapped up in 2017.

The company, which dates back to 1888, first paid a dividend in 1924. Abbott has raised its dividend for 47 straight years.

W.W. Grainger

Market value: $17.0 billion

Dividend yield: 1.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 47

Analysts’ opinion: 2 strong buy, 0 buy, 14 hold, 0 underperform, 1 sell

W.W. Grainger (GWW, $303.46) – which not only sells industrial equipment and tools, but provides other services such as helping companies manage inventory – is expected to generate steady-if-not spectacular sales growth for the next few years. Revenue is forecast to rise 6% this year and 5.2% in 2020.

Fortunately for the income-minded, Grainger has lifted its payout every year for 47 years and maintains a reasonable 39% payout ratio.

PPG Industries

Market value: $25.4 billion

Dividend yield: 1.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 46

Analysts’ opinion: 5 strong buy, 1 buy, 10 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Things have been lively at paints and coatings company PPG Industries (PPG, $106.09) recently, and not in a good way. The company is under pressure from an activist investor to break up its businesses, while federal prosecutors are investigating accounting irregularities.

Longer-term, however, analysts remain optimistic that the company can generate steady growth. Earnings are forecast to grow at an average annual rate of 8.7% for the next five years, according to Refinitiv. That in turn should help support PPG’s dividend, which has been paid since 1899 and raised on an annual basis for 46 years.

A.O. Smith

Market value: $8.5 billion

Dividend yield: 1.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 26

Analysts’ opinion: 8 strong buy, 0 buy, 4 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

A.O. Smith (AOS, $49.76), a manufacturer of commercial and residential water heaters, was added to the Dividend Aristocrats just last year. It last hiked its annual dividend in October, when it lifted the quarterly payout to 22 cents a share from 18 cents a share – a 22% increase. AOS noted at the time that its five-year compound annual dividend growth rate was 30%.

Analysts expect the company’s earnings to rise at a rate of almost 10% a year for the next five years, helped by the rollout of A.O. Smith water heaters at home-improvement chain Lowe’s, as well as strength across the North American market.

A.O. Smith has increased its dividend annually for 26 consecutive years.

McCormick

Market value: $16.3 billion

Dividend yield: 1.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 33

Analysts’ opinion: 1 strong buy, 0 buy, 4 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

A string of acquisitions is expected to spice up McCormick’s (MKC, $123.15) growth. The company, which makes herbs, spices and other flavorings, has been bulking up over the past three years to drive sales growth. McCormick bought Italian-flavoring company Enrico Giotti for $127 million in 2016, and spent $4.2 billion the following year to pick up RB Foods. The latter deal added prized brands such as French’s mustard and Frank’s RedHot to MKC’s portfolio.

Analysts expect average annual earnings growth of more than 9% for the next five years. That should provide support for McCormick’s dividend, which has been improved on an annual basis for 33 consecutive years.

Hormel Foods

Market value: $22.5 billion

Dividend yield: 2.0%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 53

Analysts’ opinion: 2 strong buy, 0 buy, 7 hold, 0 underperform, 1 sell

Hormel Foods (HRL, $42.11) is about as reliable as they come when it comes to income investing. The packaged food company best known for Spam has raised its annual payout every year for more than five decades.

Indeed, in November, Hormel announced its 53rd consecutive annual dividend increase – a 12% raise to 84 cents a share. The payment, to be made Feb. 15 to shareholders of record as of Jan. 14, will be the 362nd consecutive quarterly dividend paid by the company.

Hormel is rightly proud to note that it has paid a regular quarterly dividend without interruption since becoming a public company in 1928. Analysts expect the company to deliver average annual earnings growth of about 10% for the next five years.

Linde

Market value: $90.7 billion

Dividend yield: 2.0%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 25

Analysts’ opinion: 9 strong buy, 0 buy, 4 hold, 0 underperform, 1 sell

Linde (LIN, $163.43) became a Dividend Aristocrat in late 2018 after it completed its merger with Praxair, which itself was added to the illustrious list of dividend stocks in January 2018. The $90 billion tie-up of Linde and Praxair created the world’s largest industrial gasses company.

Praxair raised its dividend for 25 consecutive years before its merger, and the combined company is expected to continue to be a steady dividend payer. Prior to the merger, Linde, now headquartered in Dublin, raised its dividend every year since 2014.

Analysts project the multinational industrial firm’s earnings to increase at an average annual rate of 11% for the next five years, according to a survey by Refinitiv.

Lowe’s

Market value: $78.1 billion

Dividend yield: 2.0%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 56

Analysts’ opinion: 13 strong buy, 3 buy, 6 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

When it comes to home improvement chains, Home Depot (HD), a member of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, gets all the glory, but No. 2 rival Lowe’s (LOW, $97.22) has actually delivered superior long-term total returns.

You can chalk at least some of that up to the steadily rising dividend. Lowe’s has paid a dividend every quarter since going public in 1961, and that dividend has increased annually for more than half a century. Most recently, in June 2018, Lowe’s lifted its quarterly payout by 17% to 48 cents a share. Home Depot is also a longtime dividend payer, but its string of annual dividend increases dates back only to 2009.

Analysts expect Lowe’s to deliver average annual earnings growth of more than 15% for the next five years, according to Refinitiv.

Stanley Black & Decker

Market value: $19.7 billion

Dividend yield: 2.0%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 51

Analysts’ opinion: 12 strong buy, 1 buy, 2 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Power and hand toolmaker Stanley Black & Decker (SWK, $130.23) has paid a dividend for 142 years on an uninterrupted basis, and has increased it annually for more than half a century.

But the company isn’t just some sleepy income stock. Analysts expect SWK to generate average annual earnings growth of more than 8% a year over the next five years, thanks to a strategy of growth through acquisitions and cost cuts.

Stanley Black & Decker bought Newell Tools from Newell Brands (NWL) for $2 billion in 2016. In January 2017, it negotiated the purchase of Craftsman tools from Sears Holdings (SHLDQ) for a total of $775 million over three years and a percentage of annual sales. And last year, SWK announced the acquisition of IES Attachments for $690 million cash, and the $440 million purchase of Nelson Fastener Systems.

General Dynamics

Market value: $49.9 billion

Dividend yield: 2.2%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 21

Analysts’ opinion: 7 strong buy, 0 buy, 6 hold, 0 underperform, 2 sell

Defense contractor General Dynamics (GD, $172.71) is one of the newer members of the Dividend Aristocrats, having been added to the elite list of dividend growers in 2017. Generous military spending has helped fuel the steady stream of cash returned to shareholders. The Pentagon at the end of January awarded General Dynamics a $402 millionU.S. defense contract for Stryker system technical support services.

General Dynamics has upped its distribution for 21 consecutive years. The last raise was announced in March 2018, when GD lifted the quarterly payout by 10.7% to 93 cents a share. With a payout ratio of 32.4% – the S&P 500 has an average payout ratio of about 40% – General Dynamics should have ample room for more dividend hikes.

Walmart

Market value: $277.7 billion

Dividend yield: 2.2%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 44

Analysts’ opinion: 12 strong buy, 2 buy, 8 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

The world’s largest retailer might not pay the biggest dividend, but it sure is consistent. Walmart (WMT, $95.64) has been delivering meager penny increases to its dividend since 2014, but that has been enough to keep up its 44-year streak of consecutive annual payout hikes.

And as much as Walmart is a brick-and-mortar business, it isn’t conceding the e-commerce race to Amazon.com (AMZN). Indeed, with roughly 4,700 stores in the U.S., the retailer has hardly been passive as Amazon seduces its customers.

Walmart expects U.S. e-commerce sales to grow 35% in the 2019 fiscal year, driven by a revamped website with a focus on fashion and home goods. The company also is investing heavily in its online grocery delivery service. Market research firm eMarketer says Walmart is on track to eclipse Apple (AAPL) as the third-largest online retailer in the U.S.

Aflac

Market value: $36.4 billion

Dividend yield: 2.2%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 36

Analysts’ opinion: 3 strong buy, 0 buy, 5 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Aflac (AFL, $48.40) is a supplemental insurance company – popularized by the loud Aflac duck – with roots going back to 1955 that covers numerous workplace offerings, such as accident, short-term disability and life insurance.

In January, Aflac lifted its dividend for a 36th consecutive year, this time by 3.8% to 27 cents per share. It also pledged to buy back $1.3 billion to $1.7 billion of its own stock in 2019.

Analysts expect Aflac to generate average earnings growth of more than 9% a year for the next five years, according to Refinitiv.

Dover

Market value: $12.9 billion

Dividend yield: 2.2%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 63

Analysts’ opinion: 5 strong buy, 0 buy, 9 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Industrial conglomerate Dover (DOV, $87.93) has its hands in all sorts of industries, from Dover-branded pumps, lifts and even productivity tools for the energy business, to Anthony-branded commercial refrigerator and freezer doors.

Dividend growth has been a priority for Dover, which at 63 consecutive years of annual distribution hikes boasts the third-longest such streak among publicly traded companies. Dover last raised its dividend in August 2018, when it upped the quarterly payout by 2% to 48 cents a share.

It’s not an exciting business, though it did garner some headlines last year. Under pressure from activist investor Daniel Loeb’sThird Point hedge fund, Dover spun off its upstream energy business. Known as Apergy (APY), the spinoff began trading on the New York Stock Exchange in May 2018.

Automatic Data Processing

Market value: $63.3 billion

Dividend yield: 2.2%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 44

Analysts’ opinion: 5 strong buy, 1 buy, 13 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Automatic Data Processing (ADP, $145.54) is the world’s largest payroll processing firm, responsible for paying nearly 40 million employees and serving more than 750,000 clients across more than 140 countries.

One of ADP’s great advantages is its “stickiness.” It’s difficult and expensive for corporate customers to change payroll service providers. That competitive advantage helps throw off consistent income and cash flow. In turn, ADP has become a dependable dividend payer – one that has provided an annual raise for shareholders since 1975.

In November, ADP lifted its dividend for a 44th consecutive year. The quarterly disbursement went up 25% to 79 cents a share.

NEW ARISTOCRAT: Chubb

Market value: $62.0 billion

Dividend yield: 2.3%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 25

Analysts’ opinion: 8 strong buy, 2 buy, 2 hold, 0 underperform, 2 sell

Chubb (CB, $129.88) was added to the Dividend Aristocrats in January 2019. The insurance company last raised its payout in May 2018, when it hiked the quarterly dividend to 73 cents a share from 71 cents a share. With that move, Chubb notched its 25th consecutive year of dividend increases.

As the world’s largest publicly traded property and casualty insurance company, Chubb boasts operations in 54 countries and territories. With a payout ratio of just 27.6%, income investors can expect the company’s dividend-growth streak to continue.

Medtronic

Market value: $118.2 billion

Dividend yield: 2.3%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 41

Analysts’ opinion: 15 strong buy, 2 buy, 8 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Medtronic (MDT, $88.86), one of the world’s largest makers of medical devices, is an income machine. The company’s dividend per share has quadrupled since fiscal year 2008, Medtronic notes, and has grown at a 17% compounded annual growth rate over the past 41 years. Most recently, in June, MDT lifted its quarterly payout by 9% to 50 cents a share.

Medtronic aims to return a minimum of 50% of its free cash flow to shareholders through dividends and share repurchases. The company can steer all this cash back to shareholders thanks to the ubiquity of its products. Medtronic holds more than 4,600 patents on products ranging from insulin pumps for diabetics to stents used by cardiac surgeons. Look around a hospital or doctor’s office – in the U.S. or in about 160 other countries – and there’s a good chance you’ll see its products.

VF Corp.

Market value: $33.9 billion

Dividend yield: 2.4%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 46

Analysts’ opinion: 10 strong buy, 1 buy, 5 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

VF Corp. (VFC, $86.47) is an apparel company with a large number of brands under its umbrella, including Lee and Wrangler jeans and The North Face outdoor products. It added to its brand portfolio with the acquisition of Icebreaker Holdings – another outdoor and sport designer – under undisclosed terms in April 2018.

Analysts expect average annual earnings growth of 13.4% for the next five years. Suffice to say, VFC’s 46-year streak of annual payout hikes appears safe. In October, the company increased its quarterly dividend by 11% to 51 cents a share.

NEW ARISTOCRAT: United Technologies

Market value: $104.3 billion

Dividend yield: 2.4%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 25

Analysts’ opinion: 6 strong buy, 1 buy, 4 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

United Technologies (UTX, $121.36) was added the Dividend Aristocrats in January 2019. The industrial conglomerate – whose businesses include Pratt & Whitney aircraft engines, Otis elevators and Carrier cooling systems – has raised its dividend annually for 25 consecutive years.

UTX last lifted its payout in October, with a 5% increase to 73.5 cents a share. The company, which is a member of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, paid cash dividends on its common stock every year since 1936.

Sysco

Market value: $33.6 billion

Dividend yield: 2.4%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 50

Analysts’ opinion: 5 strong buy, 0 buy, 6 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Sysco (SYY, $65.33), a food services and restaurant supply company, is generating sales growth by making acquisitions.

Most recently, in January, it bought Waugh Foods, an Illinois broadline distributor with approximately $40 million in annual sales. Other moves include its 2016 deal for European services and supplies company Brakes Group, as well as the Supplies on the Fly e-commerce platform that same year. In February 2018, it picked up Doerle Food Services, a Louisiana broadline distributor with approximately $250 million in annual foodservice distribution sales. And then in April 2018, the firm acquired U.K.-based Kent Frozen Foods for an undisclosed sum.

However, Sysco has been able to generate plenty of growth on its own, too. The combination of organic and M&A-based growth has produced a steady ramp-up in revenues for years. Analysts also expect average earnings growth of 11.3% annually over the next half-decade. That should allow Sysco to keep up its streak of paying higher dividends, which currently sits at half a century.

Walgreens Boots Alliance

Market value: $67.3 billion

Dividend yield: 2.5%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 43

Analysts’ opinion: 3 strong buy, 1 buy, 12 hold, 1 underperform, 1 sell

Tracing its roots back to a single drugstore founded in 1901, Walgreens Boots Alliance (WBA, $71.47) has boosted its dividend every year for more than four decades. Mostly recently, it announced a hike of 10% in June 2018. It merged with Alliance Boots – a Switzerland-based health and beauty multinational – in 2014 to form the current company.

Walgreens Boots Alliance and its predecessor company, Walgreen Co., have paid a dividend in 345 straight quarters (more than 86 years) and have raised the dividend for 43 consecutive years, the company says. With a payout ratio of just 31%, investors can expect WBA’s streak to continue.

Clorox

Market value: $19.6 billion

Dividend yield: 2.5%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 41

Analysts’ opinion: 2 strong buy, 0 buy, 8 hold, 0 underperform, 3 sell

Clorox (CLX, $153.83), whose brands include its namesake bleaches, Glad trash bags and Hidden Valley salad dressing, has been weighed down by higher costs for raw materials, manufacturing and logistics, but price increases boosted profit margins in the most recent quarter and results beat Wall Street’s estimates.

It was welcome news for investors who’ve seen the share price trail the S&P 500 by a wide margin over the past year.

Something that has never been in doubt, however, is the dividend. Clorox has increased its payout every year since 1977.

McDonald’s

Market value: $136.9 billion

Dividend yield: 2.6%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 42

Analysts’ opinion: 12 strong buy, 2 buy, 6 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

The world’s largest hamburger chain also happens to be a dividend stalwart. Changing consumer tastes will always be a risk, but McDonald’s (MCD, $176.18) dividend dates back to 1976 and has gone up every year since. That’s the power of being a consumer giant that has been able to adjust itself to changing consumer tastes without losing its core.

Including dividends, McDonald’s – a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average – has generated a total return of 118% over the past five years. That beats the S&P 500 by about 46 percentage points.

MCD last raised its dividend in September, when it lifted the quarterly payout by 15% to $1.16 a share. That marked its 42 consecutive annual increase.

Colgate-Palmolive

Market value: $56.2 billion

Dividend yield: 2.6%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 55

Analysts’ opinion: 4 strong buy, 0 buy, 10 hold, 0 underperform, 1 sell

Colgate-Palmolive (CL, $65.33) sells staples ranging from toothpaste to dish detergent, and thus demand for its products tends to remain stable in good and bad economies alike.

The company derives the vast majority of its sales outside the U.S., and that has been a problem of late. A stronger dollar, stagnant demand in key overseas markets and higher input costs have been weighing on Colgate’s results. In fact, Kiplinger listed Colgate among 5 stocks to sell in 2019 for that and other reasons.

But Colgate’s dividend – which dates back more than a century, to 1895, and has increased annually for 55 years – should survive. CL last raised its quarterly dole in March 2018, when it added 5% to 42 cents a share. That may make Colgate worth a look … once it navigates its way out of its current quagmire.

NEW ARISTOCRAT: Caterpillar

Market value: $77.9 billion

Dividend yield: 2.6%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 25

Analysts’ opinion: 9 strong buy, 1 buy, 7 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Caterpillar (CAT, $130.54), the world’s largest maker of heavy construction and mining equipment, was added to the Dividend Aristocrats in January 2019. The Dow component is highly sensitive to global economic conditions. Sluggishness overseas, especially in China, is pressuring shares so far this year, but long-term income investors needn’t worry about the dividend.

Caterpillar has lifted its payout every year for 25 years. Indeed, CAT’s quarterly cash dividend has more than doubled since 2009, and it has paid a regular dividend without fail since 1933.

Nucor

Market value: $18.8 billion

Dividend yield: 2.7%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 45

Analysts’ opinion: 9 strong buy, 0 buy, 3 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Shareholders in Nucor (NUE, $60.44), the largest U.S. steelmaker, didn’t receive much help from tariffs in 2018. Instead, oversupply fears weighed on the stock.

That quickly reversed in January, however, helped by the fact that Nucor delivered strong fourth-quarter earnings and full-year guidance in mid-December.

Despite the volatility in the steel business, investors can feel good about Nucor’s dividend. The company has hiked its annual payout every year for 45 years, and it pays out a conservative 21% of profits as dividends. Analysts see annual average earnings growth coming in at 10.7% a year for the next five years.

Cincinnati Financial

Market value: $13.4 billion

Dividend yield: 2.7%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 59

Analysts’ opinion: 0 strong buy, 0 buy, 3 hold, 0 underperform, 1 sell

Cincinnati Financial (CINF, $81.85) has one of the Dividend Aristocrats’ longest streaks of consecutive annual dividend increases. Indeed, the property and casualty insurer on Feb. 1 lifted its payout for a 58th straight year. The company improved its quarterly dividend to 56 cents per share from 53 cents.

Income investors can expect more where that came from.

“Over the past 58 years, Cincinnati Financial shareholders have benefited from increasing dividends, and this action sets the stage for a 59th consecutive year,” CEO Steven Johnson said in a news release.

Analysts expect forecast average annual earnings growth of 6.4% for the next five years, according to Refinitiv data. Better news still for future dividend growth: a payout ratio of just 25%.

Johnson & Johnson

Market value: $356.4 billion

Dividend yield: 2.7%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 56

Analysts’ opinion: 3 strong buy, 2 buy, 7 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ, $133.00), founded in 1886 and public since 1944, operates in several different segments of the health-care industry. In addition to pharmaceuticals, it makes over-the-counter consumer products such as Band-Aids, Neosporin and Listerine. It also manufactures medical devices used in surgery.

The Dow component is embroiled in high-profile litigation over allegations that its iconic talcum powder is linked to cancer. However that turns out, it shouldn’t affect those who count on JNJ’s steady dividends over the long term. The health-care giant hiked its payout by 7.1% in April 2018, extending its streak of consecutive annual dividend increases to 56.

That should continue if JNJ can keep growing its earnings; analysts expect it to, at a clip of 6.8% annually on average over the next half-decade.

36. Air Products and Chemicals

Market value: $37.3 billion

Dividend yield: 2.7%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 37

Analysts’ opinion: 11 strong buy, 0 buy, 1 hold, 1 underperform, 0 sell

Air Products and Chemicals (APD, $169.91) spent much of past few years restructuring. Under pressure from investors, it started to shed some weight, including spinning off its Electronic Materials division and selling its Performance Materials business.

Air Products, which dates back to 1940, now is a slimmed-down company that has returned to focusing on its legacy industrial gases business. But it hasn’t taken its eye off the dividend, which it has improved on an annual basis for 37 years in a row. That includes a 16-cent upgrade in January 2019.

“We are proud that our dividend is expected to return $1 billion in cash to our shareholders over the next year,” the company said in a news release.

3M

Market value: $116.8 billion

Dividend yield: 2.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 60

Analysts’ opinion: 3 strong buy, 1 buy, 5 hold, 0 underperform, 2 sell

Industrial conglomerate 3M (MMM, $202.57), which makes everything from adhesives to electric circuits, kicked off the new year on a down note. The Dow component lowered its 2019 profit outlook, in part because of sluggish demand from China.

However, whatever the shorter-term holds for 3M’s share price, investors can bank on the conglomerate’s steady payouts over the long haul. While inclusion in the S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats requires a minimum of 25 years of uninterrupted annual dividend growth, MMM has much more – its dividend has improved annually for 60 consecutive years, and the payout dates back a century.

Genuine Parts

Market value: $15.1 billion

Dividend yield: 2.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 62

Analysts’ opinion: 0 strong buy, 0 buy, 5 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Automotive and industrial replacement parts maker Genuine Parts (GPC, $102.53) is best-known for the Napa brand, though it also operates under AutoTodo in Mexico and UAP in Canada. Since its founding in 1928, it has pursued a strategy of acquisitions to fuel growth. At the end of 2017, it bought Alliance Automotive Group, one of the largest distribution companies in Europe, for $2 billion.

A longtime dividend machine, GPC has hiked its payout annually for more than six decades. That includes a 7% improvement to its distribution on Feb. 20, 2018.

Illinois Tool Works

Market value: $45.7 billion

Dividend yield: 2.9%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 55

Analysts’ opinion: 3 strong buy, 0 buy, 5 hold, 1 underperform, 3 sell

Founded in 1912, Illinois Tool Works (ITW, $137.57) makes construction products, car parts, restaurant equipment and more. While ITW sells many products under the namesake brand, it also operates businesses including Foster Refrigerators, ACME Packaging Systems and the Wolf Range Company.

In August, Illinois Tool Works raised its quarterly dividend 28% to 88 cents a share. The board also authorized a new share repurchase program to buy back up to $3 billion in ITW stock. The company, which has a payout ratio of 60.1%, has upped its dividend for 55 straight years.

Procter & Gamble

Market value: $243.8 billion

Dividend yield: 2.9%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 62

Analysts’ opinion: 8 strong buy, 1 buy, 9 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

With major brands such as Tide detergent, Pampers diapers and Gillette razors, Procter & Gamble (PG, $97.92) is among the world’s largest consumer products companies. Although the economy ebbs and flows, demand for products such as toilet paper, toothpaste and soap tends to remain stable.

That hardly makes P&G completely recession-proof, but it has helped fuel reliable dividend payments for more than a century. The Dow component has paid shareholders a dividend since 1890, and has raised its dividend annually for 62 years in a row. P&G last increased its payout in April 2018.

Emerson Electric

Market value: $41.9 billion

Dividend yield: 2.9%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 62

Analysts’ opinion: 6 strong buy, 1 buy, 9 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Emerson Electric (EMR, $67.01) makes a wide variety of industrial products, ranging from control valves to electrical fittings.

The prolonged downturn in oil prices weighed on Emerson for a couple years as energy companies continued to cut back on spending. Happily, analysts now say it’s well-positioned to take advantage of the recovery in the energy sector. Earnings are forecast to increase at an average annual rate of 9% for the next five years.

Emerson has paid dividends since 1956 and has boosted its annual payout for 62 consecutive years, including its last increase in November 2018. Last year, EMR returned $2.2 billion to shareholders through dividends and share repurchases.

T. Rowe Price

Market value: $22.5 billion

Dividend yield: 3.0%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 32

Analysts’ opinion: 5 strong buy, 0 buy, 5 hold, 0 underperform, 2 sell

Asset managers such as T. Rowe Price (TROW, $94.22) have been losing market share to indexed funds of the type Vanguard offers, but the company still boasts $1.08 trillion in assets under management, and analysts expect solid top-line growth in the current fiscal year. Aided by advising fees, the company is forecast to post a 12.6% gain in revenue this year, according to data from Refinitiv.

T. Rowe Price has improved its dividend every year for 32 years, and it boasts a lean 38.5% payout ratio that should keep the annual hikes coming. The company last raised its distribution in February 2018, so another hike should be coming soon.

Federal Realty Investment Trust

Market value: $10.0 billion

Dividend yield: 3.1%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 51

Analysts’ opinion: 6 strong buy, 0 buy, 6 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Real estate investment trusts (REITs) such as Federal Realty Investment Trust (FRT, $133.42) are required to pay out at least 90% of their taxable earnings as dividends in exchange for certain tax benefits. Thus, REITs typically are a go-to source for income.

Few have been steadier than FRT.

Federal Realty Investment Trust – which owns retail and mixed-use real estate across 12 states, as well as the District of Columbia – has now hiked its payout every year for half a century, and at an annual growth rate of more than 7%. That puts it in rarefied air among REITs.

Coca-Cola

Market value: $209.7 billion

Dividend yield: 3.2%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 55

Analysts’ opinion: 6 strong buy, 0 buy, 6 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Coca-Cola (KO, $49.26) has long been known for quenching consumers’ thirst, but it’s equally effective at quenching investors’ thirst for income. The company has paid a quarterly dividend since 1920, and that dividend has increased annually for the past 55 years.

With the U.S. market for carbonated beverages on the decline for more than a decade, according to market research, Coca-Cola has responded by adding bottled water, fruit juices and teas to its product lineup to keep the cash flowing. In addition to the namesake Coca-Cola brand, KO also sports names such as Minute Maid, Powerade, Simply Orange and Vitaminwater.

Coca-Cola added another big name to its roster recently: In early January of this year, it completed the acquisition of Costa Limited, which owns the popular Costa Coffee brand that operates in more than 30 companies.

Archer Daniels Midland

Market value: $23.5 billion

Dividend yield: 3.3%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 43

Analysts’ opinion: 4 strong buy, 0 buy, 5 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Archer Daniels Midland (ADM, $41.87) processes ingredients for food and feed, including corn sweeteners, starches and emulsifiers such as lecithin. It also has a commodities trading business. It’s a truly global agricultural powerhouse, too, boasting customers in 170 countries that are served by 500 crop procurement locations and 270 ingredient plants.

But it’s a difficult business, too. Analysts surveyed by Refinitiv expect ADM’s earnings to rise at an average annual rate of just 0.6% for the next five years.

Archer Daniels Midland has paid out dividends on an uninterrupted basis for 87 years. On Feb. 5, ADM raised its quarterly dividend by 4.5% to 35 cents a share, marking its 45th consecutive year of dividend hikes.

PepsiCo

Market value: $159.4 billion

Dividend yield: 3.3%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 46

Analysts’ opinion: 7 strong buy, 0 buy, 11 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Like Coca-Cola, PepsiCo (PEP, $113.05) is working against a long-term slide in soda sales. It too has responded by expanding its offerings of non-carbonated beverages. One advantage Pepsi has that Coca-Cola doesn’t is its foods business – the company owns Frito-Lay snacks such as Doritos, Tostitos and Rold Gold pretzels, and demand for salty snacks remains solid.

In August, the company struck a deal to acquire at-home carbonated drink maker SodaStream for $3.2 billion.

Analysts expect PEP’s earnings to increase at an average annual rate of 6.4% for the next five years. That should help the company continue its dividend-growth streak of 46 years.

Franklin Resources

Market value: $15.6 billion

Dividend yield: 3.4%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 37

Analysts’ opinion: 0 strong buy, 0 buy, 4 hold, 1 underperform, 5 sell

The name Franklin Resources (BEN, $30.33) might not be well-known among investors; however, along with its subsidiaries, it’s called the more familiar Franklin Templeton investments. The global investment firm is one of the world’s largest by assets under management, and is known for its bond funds, among other offerings.

Mutual fund providers have come under pressure because customers are eschewing traditional stock pickers in favor of indexed investments. However, Franklin is fighting back by launching its first suite of passive exchange-traded funds.

The asset manager has raised its dividend annually since 1981, including a 13% hike announced in December 2018.

Target

Market value: $38.0 billion

Dividend yield: 3.5%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 47

Analysts’ opinion: 6 strong buy, 0 buy, 9 hold, 0 underperform, 1 sell

Target (TGT, $72.51) might be the No. 2 discount retail chain after Walmart in terms of revenue, but it doesn’t take a back seat to the behemoth from Bentonville when it comes to dividends.

Target paid its first dividend in 1967, seven years ahead of Walmart, and has raised its payout annually since 1972. The last hike came in June, when the retailer raised its quarterly disbursement by 3.2% to 64 cents a share.

With a payout ratio of 42%, income investors can count on Target to keep hitting the mark for dividend growth. Analysts forecast average annual earnings expansion of 8% for the next five years.

Leggett & Platt

Market value: $5.9 billion

Dividend yield: 3.5%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 47

Analysts’ opinion: 2 strong buy, 1 buy, 2 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Leggett & Platt (LEG, $44.11) has its hands in several pies, including producing steel wire; designing and manufacturing seating support systems for automobiles; and making components for manufacturers of upholstered furniture, beds and other home furnishings.

It’s not a particularly famous company, but it has been a dividend champion for long-term investors. Leggett & Platt’s payout has gotten better for 47 consecutive years and in 55 of the past 56 years.

Kimberly-Clark

Market value: $38.9 billion

Dividend yield: 3.6%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 47

Analysts’ opinion: 1 strong buy, 0 buy, 7 hold, 0 underperform, 4 sell

Kimberly-Clark’s (KMB, $114.16) well-known brands include Huggies diapers, Scott paper towels and Kleenex tissues. Like other makers of consumer staples, Kimberly-Clark holds out the promise of delivering slow but steady growth along with a healthy dividend to drive total returns.

Kimberly-Clark has paid out a dividend for 84 consecutive years, and has raised the annual payout for the past 47 years. In January, KMB announced a 3% increase in the quarterly dividend for 2019. The company notes that in 2018, it returned $2.2 billion to shareholders through dividends and share repurchases.

Analysts polled by Refinitiv expect earnings to grow at an average annual rate of 2.9% over the next five years.

Cardinal Health

Market value: $15.1 billion

Dividend yield: 3.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 33

Analysts’ opinion: 1 strong buy, 0 buy, 8 hold, 1 underperform, 1 sell

A steady stream of acquisitions helped wholesale drug and medical device distributor Cardinal Health (CAH, $50.79) become the giant that it is today.

More recently, it has been embroiled in legal actions related to the nation’s opioid epidemic. In late 2016, Cardinal Health agreed to pay $44 million to the Department of Justice to settle allegations that it failed to report suspicious drug orders. And in early 2017, the company agreed to a $20 million settlement with the state of West Virginia.

However, Cardinal Health is looking for new life with its $6.1 acquisition of Medtronic’s Patient Care, Deep Vein Thrombosis and Nutritional Insufficiency business, completed in July 2017.

On the dividend front, Cardinal Health has upped the ante on its annual payout for 33 years and counting. The company last raised its dividend in May, when it announced a 3% increase to 47.63 cents a share.

Consolidated Edison

Market value: $24.1 billion

Dividend yield: 3.8%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 45

Analysts’ opinion: 0 strong buy, 0 buy, 6 hold, 0 underperform, 3 sell

Consolidated Edison (ED, $77.26) is one of the nation’s largest utility stocks by market value. Founded in 1823, it provides electric, gas and steam service for the 10 million customers in New York City and Westchester County. And like most utilities, Consolidated Edison enjoys a fairly stable stream of revenues and income thanks to a dearth of direct competition.

As a result, the utility company has been able to hike its annual distribution without interruption for more than four decades. The most recent increase came in January, when ED lifted its quarterly payout to 74 cents a share from 71.5 cents a share.

Chevron

Market value: $227.2 billion

Dividend yield: 4.0%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 32

Analysts’ opinion: 10 strong buy, 1 buy, 5 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Chevron (CVX, $118.88) is an integrated oil giant that also has operations in natural gas and geothermal energy. And like its competitors, Chevron hurt when oil prices started to tumble in 2014. The energy major was forced to slash spending as a result, but – reassuringly – it never slashed its dividend.

Cut to today, and the outlook for oil looks much more stable. Kiplinger forecasts that prices will range from $65 to $70 a barrel in the months ahead – a far better environment than what energy companies were dealing with a few years ago.

With more than three decades of uninterrupted dividend growth under its belt, Chevron’s track record instills confidence that the payouts will continue. The most recent hike came in January, when CVX lifted its quarterly dividend to $1.19 a share from $1.12 a share.

NEW ARISTOCRAT: People’s United Financial

Market value: $6.3 billion

Dividend yield: 4.2%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 25

Analysts’ opinion: 2 strong buy, 1 buy, 9 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

People’s United Financial (PBCT, $16.73) was added to the Dividend Aristocrats in January 2019. The regional financial services firm – which operates more than 400 branches in Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine – has $48 billion in total assets. The venerable New England institution traces its roots back to 1842.

In April 2018, the firm hiked its dividend for a 25th consecutive year. Analysts expect the company to deliver average annual earnings growth of 13.7% for the next five years.

Exxon Mobil

Market value: $318.9 billion

Dividend yield: 4.4%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 36

Analysts’ opinion: 3 strong buy, 1 buy, 7 hold, 0 underperform, 2 sell

A descendant of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil, today’s Exxon Mobil (XOM, $75.26) remains one of the world’s largest energy companies and is the biggest oil company by market value in the U.S.

As a dividend stalwart – Exxon and its various predecessors have strung together uninterrupted payouts since 1882 – it continued to hike its payout even as oil prices declined in recent years. The Dow component has increased its dividend for 36 consecutive years, and has done so at an average annual rate of 6.3%. That includes a 7% boost to its quarterly checks announced in late April.

AbbVie

Market value: $119.0 billion

Dividend yield: 5.4%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 46

Analysts’ opinion: 2 strong buy, 0 buy, 8 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

AbbVie’s (ABBV, $79.08) corporate heritage will sound very familiar. The pharmaceutical maker was spun off from Abbott Laboratories in 2013, and like its parent, it carries a longstanding dividend payment. Including its time as part of Abbott, AbbVie upped its annual distribution for 46 consecutive years, with the last hike coming in mid-February 2018.

Best-selling treatments include Humira for rheumatoid arthritis and AndroGel, a testosterone replacement therapy. All told, AbbVie’s pipeline includes more than 35 products across various stages of clinical trials.

AT&T

Market value: $215.3 billion

Dividend yield: 6.9%

Consecutive annual dividend increases: 35

Analysts’ opinion: 9 strong buy, 2 buy, 8 hold, 0 underperform, 0 sell

Telecommunications stocks are synonymous with dividend payments. Customers pay for service every month, which ensures a steady stream of cash to fund dividends. AT&T (T, $29.56) – the largest U.S. telecom company – is a perfect example.

AT&T has raised its dividend on an annual basis for 35 consecutive years, and typically boasts one of the highest dividend yields in the S&P 500. That’s in large part because of the cash flows generated by the telecom business, which enjoys what some call an effective duopoly with rival Verizon (VZ). Together, the pair command almost 70% of the U.S. wireless subscriptions market, according to data from Statista.

This article provided by NewsEdge.